Archives for posts with tag: transit

Guelph_Transit_237Guelph is a small city with a small bus system.

Unlike in larger cities where many buses ply the same routes all day with 5-10 minute headways, Guelph can’t afford to do that – there are too few people.

What I initially felt was a bummer — buses every 20-30 minutes at peak times and every hour at other times of day — turned one of the system’s greatest strengths: reliability.

This seems like a major paradox – how can you build a robust transit system by providing less?

Transit planners have a maxim that people won’t adopt public transportation unless its frequent and reliable. In Toronto, it often feels like it’s frequent but not reliable. In Guelph, however, the service may not be frequent, but it is very reliable.

Because the bus comes so infrequently, users are forced to use the schedule to see when their bus is coming. The bus system becomes more like a train system in this way – fixed times when the bus will be coming that you can plan your routine around.

While the buses sometimes detract from their schedule, key points in their routes, like the University Centre and Guelph Central Station, put them back on schedule. At these transfer points, the bus will wait until their scheduled departure time to depart.

I think Guelph’s bus system would be much more frustrating if it didn’t follow a schedule and used the same amount of service at more random intervals. The degree of reliability would tire out the most dedicated transit user.

But as it stands, it works great. As Guelph grows, it will require a larger fleet of buses with more frequency – but until then, and in other small cities in Ontario and beyond, the reliability of a less is more approach to transit, while at first seeming like a contradictory approach to establishing a robust transit system, is a good way to go.

Karen Stintz announced the proposed OneCity transit plan today.

Awesome.

Using a language of unity rather than a false suburbs downtown divide. This is one system, one region, the efficiency of downtown routes directly effects the suburban.

Best of luck to the fine people of toronto, may they be protected from divisive politics and incompetent leadership

Last night, I rode the subway from Bayview station on the Sheppard line to Bathurst station on the Bloor-Danforth line, which requires to transfers and thus three subways in total.

The experience was wonderful. At 1am, the subways were packed full of festive Torontonians, some quiet, some more rowdy shouting “Happy New Year!” to the passers-by, and chatting up their fellow subway riders. Social conventions of riding public transit with as little interaction with others as possible was thrown out the window. Unlikely groups of riders were sharing laughs together and taking pictures and enjoying themselves.

All I could think while riding the subway last night was how important this was for the city. The ttc was free from midnight to 4am to celebrate and curb impaired driving, and as a result, thousands of Torontonians shared a New Year’s Eve experience together. It is these critical moments where the collective unconsciousness, and the collective experiences of the urban manifest themselves. Living in a city and describing it’s feeling is often an abstract phenonmenon that we can’t quite put our finger on. But at a moment when people from all walks of life are riding together in metal trains underground at an unlikely hour, this is when the city presents itself to us, and we all feel excited to participate in it.