Exciting news, dear readers!

Your Urban Geographer is taking flight, and traveling to the biggest city in Carolinia — New York City, that is.

Though I defined the southern limits of Carolinia’s borders as a small portion of upstate New York, a broader definition of the Carolinian bioregion includes New York City — the same forest as Toronto. The Carolinian forest is known as the Eastern Deciduous forest in the US due to slightly different approaches to ecology north and south of the border. In any case, I am excited to explore New York City with this bioregional lens.

Though there are no ravines in New York City, to my knowledge, I will explicitly find my way to forested urban areas, to feel the forest. Will it feel familiar? Will I recognize the species? Will I find parallels between New York and Torontonian culture, since they have the same ecology?

My hypothesis for Toronto is that the Carolinian ecoregion is dynamic, small scale and dense. The dynamacy certainly holds true for New York, but does the small scale, dense beauty remain the same there? Since Toronto is at the northern edge of Carolinia, perhaps the growth gets larger further south, explaining New York’s propensity for grandeur. We will have to wait and see.

For now, one clue is the New York Parks and Recreation logo: a maple leaf — an important species for Carolinia, up here.

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